Woman Spends 14 Years Photographing World’s Oldest Trees

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San Francisco-based photographer, Beth Moon, spent the last 14 years criss-crossing the world in search of the oldest trees to capture with her camera. She has traveled all around the globe to capture the most magnificent trees that grow in remote locations and look as old as the world itself.

“Standing as the earth’s largest and oldest living monuments, I believe these symbolic trees will take on a greater significance, especially at a time when our focus is directed at finding better ways to live with the environment” writes Moon in her artist statement.

In this age of digital photography, Moon believes the convenience of digital film has turned the fine art into a commodity. To avoid becoming part the modern desktop darkroom, she develops her prints with a platinum/palladium process. With platinum printing, noted for its beautiful luminosity and wide tonal scale, the absence of a binder layer allows very fine crystals of platinum to be embedded into the paper giving it a 3 dimensional appearance. Unrivaled by any other printing process, platinum, like gold, is a stable metal. A print can potentially last for thousands of years.

Moon’s collected work of 60 duo-tone prints were recently published in a new book titled Ancient Trees: Portraits of Time.

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Curious about the platinum printing process? Then be sure to check out the video below.